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coverage in america. now, during the pontiac summer closeout. (tucci) count on the nation's fastest 3g network. at&t every head. every bite. every gallon. every shoe. every book. every cereal. well, maybe not every cereal. but every stem. every stitch. every tune. every toy. pretty much everything you buy can help your savings account grow because keep the change from bank of america rounds up every debit card purchase to the next dollar and transfers the difference from your checking to savings account. it's one of the many ways we make saving money in tough times a whole lot easier. and you know what, it works. nutrisystem for men: flexible new programs personalized to meet your goals. what's great about nutrisystem is you eat the foods you love and you lose weight. i'm dan marino. i lost 22 pounds on nutrisystem and i've kept it off for three years. for a limited time, get an extra three weeks of meals free! that's right, you can get an extra 21 breakfasts, lunches, dinners, desserts, and snacks. that's 105 meals free! i had awesome results. i mean, i lost 22 pounds, my goal was 20,
, follow me. >>> this is a rehearsal, right, we're not really on the air?'rn okay, good. hello, america. i always wanted to be a a community organizer because ibu love communities and i love one being organized, they are in! such disarray. the community organizer in chief is transforming america but nobody is really noticing and i think it is because theyi don't know what they are looking for. th i want to show youey ano pwictu here. bring this picture up. ca i want you to loon ykou at thio picture and tell me what ispic changing in this picture. this it from the university ofv south dakota department of dak psychology, their website.ir w this is a test based on antifih scientific theory called change blindness. a theory that i think might in help explain what is happening in our country right now.nd i was doing some research this weekend and i brought it down t to about ten different people , at my house, i'm usually on psychology websites. invisual perception, change blindness is a phenomena that s occurs when a person is viewine a visual scene and fails to detect large changes in the sc
schools. data-driven results. that's what we will reward with our race to the top fund. america will not succeed in the 21st century unless we do a un better job of educating our sons and daughters. >> as children across the nation return to their classrooms this week, one fact is clear. education is vital for america. and it needs reform. so says the u.s. president. the centerpiece of the obama reform is a $5 billion cash surge. it will be used to overhaul america's underperforming schools. the $5 billion will not flow automatically to the u.s.'s 50 states. they must compete head-to-head, and justify whatever money they get. >> this competition will not be based on politics, or ideology, or the preferences of a particular interest group. instead, it will be based a simple principle. whether a state is ready to do what works. >> question: president obama has an education reform package. does it foster competition between the states? or facilitate federal control over education? pat buchanan. >> it will do both. i mean the states will compete for the federal money expect that wi
everything because they have no cars. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. it is saturday, august 29th. good morning, kate. >> good morning, bill. we're here at the jfk presidential library in boston. senator ted kennedy lies in repose behind me in this building. we're told family members at this hour are getting ready at their hotel to come here. a senate delegation will come here, as well. they will all pay their last respects. and we'll have coverage of the senator's journey to his final resting place. we'll talk to one of his nephews about his legacy. and some of his former staffers, like supreme court justice stephen breyer, who said working for ted kennedy was like a family. we know you have more, bill? >> we do. >>> we have more on that shocking story. jaycee lee dugard, held for 18 years. we're learning details of her ordeal, including reports that the neighbors voiced some concerns three years ago. but investigators never made it past the front porch. >>> and also, another story out of california. everything must go. that is, if it's government pro
on the czars an statements that should horrify america and connections to some other people and to the white house and what it means for your healthcare in the future, particularly if you are elderly, handicapped or have a very young child. if you believe this country is great but that government healthcare is taking us in directions we promised ourselves we would never go down again, stand up. come, follow me. hello, america. tonight i ask you to stay with the program. this is not a sound byte program tonight, although it will be taken out of context and it will be used and it will be called fear mongering. what i call this is question with boldness. questions that need answers. we must have answers. i am only following the directions of the president of the united states. he told us how to find out what he really believes and that's exactly what we're going to do. in a couple of minutes, we're going to talk about healthcare, the views of obama's czars and his close advisors and why it's important to look there. it's important to know where they stand, but first, i want to start someplace t
and missiles and on the heels of news that three more americans are now being held in a country america does not have a diplomatic relationship with, iran. does this pump up one dictator and embolden others? we're joined now by pedavid gern and peter brooks. david, i want to start with you. it's almost impossible to ignore the message that it's sends to north korea and others that may be on shaky ground with the u.s. the next time they have u.s. citizens in their custody they can use them as bargaining chips to talk with high-level people, rewarding bad behavior. how do they keep that from happening? >> erica, i think this has a more important message to the world, and that is that america is a country that cares about its own, it will go to great lengths, a former president will fly around the world to bring back two innocent brave americans to reunite them with their families and that individuals matter in this country. and this situation, we didn't give anything away. it's not as if there was a bargain or a negotiation. rather, we had a brutal regime that captured these two young women. a
of which i think we must respect. >> beth mendelsohn with voice of america, the afghanistan service. if one of the candidates doesn't get 50% and this goes into a second round and things get complicated there, what are the constitutional laws that are in place? can karzai call the loya jirga? and also if it goes the way some of the things did in iran, what is the united states prepared to do in these circumstances? >> rinna? >> i'd like barney to comment on this as well. if there is a security situation then there are stipulations where a loya jirga can be called. but i'd like barney to speak in more detail about this as well. >> well, i'm not sure what your question is about. according to the constitution if no one gets more than 50% of the vote, then a second round has to be held within two weeks of the date of announce mentd of the result. perhaps your question is what is -- if there is civil conflict and it is not possible to do that. we of course do not want to address hypothetical questionsb3 like that. there is an international presence in afghan government that is our partner and if
by fox news channel] david: the fix for america's money fix is cutting welfare spending. that's a forbes flip side sure to get you fired up. hi, everybody. i'm david asman. welcome to "forbes on fox." california is slashing welfare to save money. and, jack, you say all of america should do the same? >> absolutely. california is going to emerge from this budget crisis stronger in a couple of years' time because they've been forced to make hard decisions. one of those is cutting welfare. its welfare budge set $10 billion for 2010. they're going to have to trim that to become solvent. we can all take an example of that. yes, you need some short-term solution for unemployment benefits when people lose their jobs. but after that, encourage them to get back at work. at least have contingency that encourage looking for a job. david: so we should follow you in california? >> this is not born out by the fact. california kicked the can down the street. they borrowed from municipalities, cut $15 billion from education. at the last minute headlines by cutting against welfare. but what did he cut? he
northern virginia here on c-span. >> good morning. i am an intern scholar here at the young america foundation, a leading organization on college campuses. if you would like to take advantage of the resources or campus activism, such as booking speakers were getting materials for events, please contact us by phone or online at our website, www.yaf.org. our next speaker is president of the washington d.c.-based research council which leads the way in defending the judeo- christian values upon which our nation was built. he served in the louisiana state legislature as recognized as a pioneer by offering many measures. he hosts a national radio program called "washington watched weekly." his first book was released just last year. copies will be available of this book for purchase and signing after his talk. a veteran of the u.s. marine corps and a former police officer and tv news reporter, he brings a unique blend of experience and leadership to the pro-family movement. please welcome mr. tony perkins. [applause] >> good morning. it is good to see a friendly crowd here in d.c. for
>>> good morning, america. this morning, a brand-new abc news poll show nows more than half of americans approve of president obama's health care plan. is the president about to go into gladiator mode to get it passed? >>> outrage at the heroes welcome the lockerbie bomber receives after his release. we asked, why did great britain do this? >>> storm surge. the latest on the path of the giant hurricane, bill. >>> stalled on the highway. some popular foreign cars are suddenly just shutting down in traffic. an exclusive "gma" investigation. and this morning, a recall. >>> and need more sleep? 70 million of us do. and our team here at abc puts the latest solutions to the and our team here at abc puts the latest solutions to the test. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, america. i'm diane sawyer, here with david muir this morning. robin is away. chris is away this friday, august 21st, 2009. and there's a tsunami of outrage, pours over great britain this morning. >> all of the pictures pouring in. a hero's welcome for the bomber of the lockerbie pan am flight. al
, for purple mountain majesties above the fruited plain, america, america, god shed his grace on thee, and crown-high good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea. oh beautiful for heroes pride in liberating strife who more than self their country loved and mercy more than life, america, ameri america, may god till all success be nobleness and every ♪undimmed by human tears ameri america, america god shed his grace on thee and crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪. . [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2009] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. hut. ♪ ♪ ♪ . >> a motorcade carrying the casket made its way to arlington national cemetery to the capitol building. he was laid to rest next to his brothers john and robert. this money is half an hour. >> there's a certain fittingness at having a burial at the dying of the day because we know that the sun will come back again tomorr tomorrow. and, as we think of teddy, we know that his new life begins. and as we look at this great family, we
was going to help deliver a post racial america. so by having the knee jerk reaction against the white police officer, boy did he throw that in reverse. so he wastrying to correct both of those things with this beer summit. >> if henry gates were white and not black, do you think that any of this -- >> nobody would have paid any attention to it. smoz it was henry kissinger, everybody would have laughed and said they cuffed henry. it would have been a joke. >> if he were white, all of those talk show hosts who are screaming now about what obama did would be saying this is the sanctity of a man's home and it was invaded by the storm troopers. >> you are telling me if it was alan dershowitz we would have complained if they cuffed him? >> maybe not dershowitz. >> the fact that henry louis gates is a famous guy, a harvard professor is what brought it to the national station stage. this is a good opportunity -- >> do you think professor gates was outraged? they brought him to the police headquarters and photographed him. >> when i came to the states, the first thing i was told was don't argu
again, but it did. citigroup, bank of america, nine of the firms that received bailout money paid out billions and billions in bonuses. citigroup alone which suffered losses last year got $45 billion and paid out $5.3 billion in bonuses. yet the white house has been pretty quiet. isn't the president outraged again? >> that's why he has supported things like say on pay, to make sure as we go forward at least shareholders are minding the store. we also did appoint a special master there in the treasury department to take these decisions out of political hands, someone who is supposed to be watching those firms that are getting extensive government and taxpayer money. he's certainly going to be making recommendations. >> will you assure us it won't happen again this year? remember what mr. gfineberg's description was. what he's working at is sort of balancing off the, are they going to be able to retain talent with our sense of outrage, with our sense of what's reasonable, with the sense of are we encouraging too much risk taking? we're going to trust him. >> moving on, one of the presid
into a motion picture from warner brothers. its subject is america after an electromagnetic pulse attack. thank you again for being here. good to see you. >> thank you. >> i'm afraid there are many people waveng who perhaps don't know what an electromagnetic pulse attack would be. maybe we'd start with your explaining that attack. >> it's a byproduct of any detonation of any nuclear weapon. first realizing some testing in the '60s and before we go any further, i know this sounds like sci-fi. so you in the audience, folks watching this later -- if this sounds like sci-fi, this evening go on the internet, google up emp, go to wikipedia. here's a couple of other things you should look up. starfish crime which was the american test in 1962 of detonating a weapon in space which blew out a fair part of the power grid in hawaii. also look up soviet test 184. and then finally if you want to look at a completely different aspect of emp look up the carrington event which was actually triggered by a solar storm. and to go back to answering your question, emp, electromagnetic pulse, is a byproduct of deton
of air america and dana lohse affiliated with the st. louis tea party. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? we wonder, has this whole thing devovled to the point where it is unproductive but potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it can be dangerous. congress is sfonsable for setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for discourse for one of the most important pieces of legislation in american history that is what people are reacting to. they are tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. we are seeing people who are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and they want to express their conditions about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about the argument, this is not organized, but a grassroots movement and deeply concerned about health care. >> that is fine to get involved and it is good to show up at a town hall meeting and have a conversation. you have to have the conversation and have the discussion. many of these people, not all, many of these people are clearly showing up to shut the conversation
been a place of retreat and renewal for america's greatest political dynasty. now they remember a patriarch, and this town remembers a friend. sam barber sold him paintings. >> i'm going to miss him terribly. i'm speechless. >> reporter: ted kennedy's father bought a cottage here in 1928, thinking it would be good for the kids' health. three decades later, ted's brothers john and robert purchased surrounding homes, creating this three acre property simply known as the compound. john is the editor of "the last lion." >> for years of his life, this was the home. this was the one home they kept returning to. they lived in new york, massachusetts, london, england, but for john, this was his anchor. >> reporter: the brothers played their famous games of touch football on the lawn here, training for the youngest brother, a star at harvard. >> i think this was the center of his young world. so many things happened here. certainly, in times of tragedy, this is where the kennedys gathered. >> reporter: a place of mourning too many times for the kennedy clan. ted was there in 1999 when he
negotiations with the americas. >> right. >> clinton comes over and the north koreans say we have had exhaustive talks. what they are saying is we got our one-on-one. >> you take everything that the north koreans say at face value? how naive. >> why would you disbelieve it? [ all talking at once ] >> hold on, please. >> any one of the americans sent over to, in a sense, escort them back would have put ourselves subject to that. i don't see any problem with it. >> you are failing to relinquish. >> i'm sorry. >> i want to remind you or you remind me, did the north koreans detonate a nuclear bomb in may? >> they have done so twice most recently in may. kim jong-il chose bill clinton because he gave away the nuclear sword to him in 1994 and allowed him to acquire the nuclear weapons. >> i'm sorry. >> kim was cheating on us before that was -- >> we can't let that stand unchallenged. >> jimmy carter -- [ all talking at once ] >> that can't stand unchallenged. president clinton didn't negotiate a framework when george w. bush came in. colin powell wanted to continue that. the bush administr
at 7:00. don't forget, wusa9.com. a few hours ago this campaign came to an end. >> couric: america mourns the lion of the senate. >> we on this side are interested in protecting american servicemen from the close fire of a civil war. >> couric: the man who carried the torch and the burden of a political dynasty. through triumph, tragedy... >> my brother need not be idealized or enlarged in death what... beyond what he was in life. >> couric: and scandal. >> for this reason i would understand full well why some might think it right for me to resign. >> couric: and leave the legacy of landmark legislation that changed millions of lives. >> the work goes on, the cause endures. the hope rises again and the dream lives on. >> couric: tonight, the life of senator ted kennedy. captioning sponsored by cbs good evening, i'm katie couric. this is the "cbs evening news," there is, of course, no royal family in this country. the kennedys, perhaps, the closest we've ever had. for the past 40 years, senator edward kennedy was the patriarch, the last surviving brother of a political dynasty until
kennedy, a man who fought passionately and pragmatically in the senate. >> he challenged our america, and our teddy changed america. >> people have called teddy and me the odd couple, which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friends, warren hatch of utah and christopher dodd of connecticut, share their personal memories. plus senator maria wall of washington on the post-kennedy debate for office. and in our american dispatch, the kennedy connection to boston sports dynasty. i talked to the president and ceo of the red sox, larry laquino. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. senator andrews gets the last word. "state of the union" report for sunday, august 30. >>> a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs and someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral of senator edward kennedy in boston yesterday. president obama led the eulogy in saying goodbye at arlington cemetary. here is a reflection on senator kennedy's life, oren hatch of utah and senator christopher dodd. se
? no, i have them. huh. the new lightweight hp mini netbook with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. sean: democrats claim all the americans protesting their health care bill are being organized by insurance companies. it looks like the party on the left is doing organizing of their own. george soros has pledged $5 billion million dollars left wing groups health care bill with a public option. speaker pelosi are all the people who organize things to soros contribututututututioutut >> leave us alone. that's all we would ask for. would you leave us alone? >> i'm sick of the lies. i don't like being lied to. i don't like being lied about. >> you have awakened the sleeping giant. >> amen. >> we are tired of this. this is why everybody in this room is so ticked off. >> we cannot afford, this period. keep the government out of it we're doing just fine. thank you, sir. sean: very powerful. more sights and sounds from senator specter's town hall me
boonedoggle? and they're spreading across america and no one can stop them. >> the blob is back. >> now states are hiring czars. why someone here says you better pay attention because your money is at risk. plus, this wasn't what cash for clunkers was supposed to be about. >> girls, girls, girls. hello, girls! >> your tax dollars going to buy luxury cars? it's another outrage alert. all of that and -- >> i made a little decision. >> you finally got botox! >> a botox tax to pay for health care? we can't make this stuff up. your innocent, your life, your show to stay ahead of the game. "cashin' in" starts right now. terry: a huge bust over medicare fraud. more than 30 people indicted in four states this week as lawmakers in congress promise to deliver a whole new government-run health care program. proof we need to fix medicare first? hello, everyone. i'm terry keenan. welcome to "cashin' in." here to debate this, our "cashin' in" crew. wayne rogers, john that than, jonas, tracy burns and john. also joining us, an old friend of the program, rob stein, managing director at astar asset management.
. >>> congress heads home to face america divided over health care changes. to discuss the policy and political divides with two key senators. john cornyn of texas, dick durbin of illinois. >>> and the big gap between the president's approval rating and his handling of the big issues. we take america's pulse with two top polls. >>> and the recession puts a squeeze on many community support organizations just when struggling parents and hungry children need the help most. the state of the union report for sunday, august 9th. >>> president obama heads to mexico tonight for a summit with the leaders of mexico and canada, a reminder of the mounting international pressures even as he struggles to sell his top domestic priority health care here at home. >>> greater cooperation fighting mexico's deadly drug world. and elsewhere on the stage, afghanistan, iran, and north korea all present the white house with difficult policy choices. the full and often frustrating list for the president and for his ambassador to the united nations susan rice. welcome. >> good to be with you. >> let's start with iran,
, outrageous. >> you didn't want it to happen again, and news this week, it did. citigroup, bank of america, nine of the firms that received bailout money paid out billions and billions in bonuses. citigroup alone, which suffered losses last year got $45 billion and paid out $5.3 billion in bonuses and yet the white house has been pretty quiet. is the president outraged again? >> you know, certainly the president is very concerned about executive compensation in general. that's part of why he supported things like say on pay, again, to make sure as we go forward that at least shareholders are minding the store. we also did appoint a special master there in the treasury department to take these decisions out of political hands, someone who is is supposed to be watching those firms that are getting extensive government and taxpayer money. and he's certainly going to be making recommendations. >> will you assure us it won't happen again this year? >> remember what mr. fineberg's job description? he's trying to walk a line. weapon want them to earn money, pay the taxpayers back. absolutely what
stephanopoulos made an amazing statement. let's hear him on "good morning america." >> white house officials have talked privately whether to use the clintons more on health care. you saw president clinton go out and speak to the left progress i bes in that net roots convention last week where he warned them of the consequences of failure there. there have also been discussions whether to employ secretary of state clinton. no final decision on that yet. >> howard, i always thought that this coalition and i know chuck's focused on it, this coalition of the clintons and barack obama is critical, not just on foreign policy but it's not -- this ace political merger. will they come out and help. >> what george said is the staff has talked about it. chuck may have better information than i, but from what i can tell, they have it, if they're going to do it, they haven't asked bill clinton about it yet. did i ask one top white house official what about it. are you going to have clinton involved. he said it's news to me at this point. >> chuck, are you skeptical. >> i'm very skeptival. think about it for
inspired our america. robert kennedy challenged our america. and our teddy changed america. >> people called teddy and me the odd couple, which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friends, orrin hatch of utah and christopher dodd of connecticut share their personal memories. >>> plus senator maria cantwell of washington on the post-kennedy health care debate in the congress. and my exclusive interview with the late senator's nephew robert f. kennedy jr. and in our american dispatch, the kennedy connection to boston's sports dynasty. i talk to the president and ceo of the red sox. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. louisiana senator mary landrieu gets the last word. "the state of the union" report for sunday august 30th. a champion for those who had none. a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs. someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral yesterday. president obama led the nation in saying good-bye to the 77-year-old senator who was laid to rest near his brothers j
>>> good morning, america. we awake to breaking news, that senator edward kennedy, political giant, lion of the senate, has died. this is what we do.americans. we reach the moon. we scale the heights. i know it. i've seen it. i've lived it. >> the last brother of an american dynasty, slipping away in the night, surrounded by family. a 15-month fight against brain cancer comes to an end. we're live at the kennedy compound with the story of the last days, as america mourns a man who carried the country's passion and pain on his shoulders. >> the cause endures. the hope still lives. and the dream shall never die. >> a special edition of "good morning america," remembering >> a special edition of "good morning america," remembering senator ted kennedy. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> as we say a good, and sad morning to you. diane sawyer with chris cuomo, on this august 26th, 2009. robin is on assignment. we're joined by george stephanopoulos and dr. tim johnson and the abc news team. you're looking live at hyannisport, massachusetts, right now. and the home where senator kennedy di
america. robert kennedy challenged our america. and our teddy changed america. >> people have called teddy and me the odd couple. which was certainly true. >> two of senator kennedy's closest friend, orrin hatch of utah, and christopher dodd of connecticut share their personal memories. plus, senator maria cantwell of washington on the post kennedy health care debate in congress. and exclusive interview with robert f. kennedy, jr. and in our "american dispatch", the kennedy connection to boston sports dynasty. i talk to the president and ceo, larry luccino. four years now since hurricane katrina devastated the gulf coast. mary landrieu gets the last word. >>> a champion for those who had none. a man who never stopped trying to right wrongs. and someone who wasn't perfect but believed in redemption. just a few of the sentiments expressed at the funeral of senator edward kennedy in boston yesterday. president obama led the nation in saying good-bye to the 77-year-old senator laid to rest by brothers john and robert. hear the reflections on the senator's life and work, senator orrin hatch of
estate market. had no government entity existed when private mortgage capital tried up and 2008, america's housing market would have come to a complete halt throwing out -- throwing our needs the commission into a deeper recession. we need only look at the current status of the if affairs in the commercial and mortgage market to see how different things might be today in the tradition -- if the traditional -- if the traditional regular mortgage market without fannie may and freddie mac. for those reasons realtors believe pure privatisation of the gse is unacceptable. rather, we support a secondary mortgage market model that includes some level of government participation, protect the taxpayers and ensures all creditworthy consumers have reasonable access to affordable mortgage capital. nar is currently conducting research to determine what model for the secondary mortgage market would best achieve these goals. we will share that information with you as soon as it is completed. for now, i would like to briefly outline a set of nine principles that nar's board of directors has adopted and
for some time now, we awaited it with no small amount of dread. >> couric: perhaps nowhere in america is senator kennedy's loss felt more deeply than in boston, the city where his grandfather once served as mayor. national correspondent jim axelrod is there. >> reporter: from the priest saying midday mass at a downtown boston church... >> senator kennedy was a worshiper here and a great supporter of st. anthony's shrine. >> reporter: to new england's high profile superbowl coach. >> i have a lot of personal regret today on the passing of senator kennedy. >> reporter: and everyone in between. >> he was for the rights of everybody. he was for the rights of the disabled. he was for women's rights. he was for the civil rights movement. >> reporter: the people of boston are mourning deeply. for as much as senator kennedy was a player on the world stage, here he was teddy. and teddy belonged to them. reporter and boston native marty nolan covered kennedy for 40 years and wrote today's obituary in the "boston globe." >> he was full of charm and he enjoyed the odd drop after hours and so did
america never die. i love you, dad. and you will always live in my heart forever. [applause] [applause] >> your eminence, vicki, cara, edward, patrick, currin, caroline, members of the kennedy family, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens,. todacitizens, today we say goodbye to the youngest child of rose and joseph kenne kennedy. the world will long remember their son edward as the heir to a weighty legacy. a champion for those who had none. the soul of the democratic party and the lion of the united states senate. a man who graces nearly 1,000 laws, who's penned more than 300 laws himself. but those of us who loved him and ache with his passing know ted kennedy by the other titles he held: father, brother, husband, grandfather, uncle teddy, or, as he was often known to his younger nieces and nephews, the grand fromage, or the big cheese. [laughter] i, like so many others in the city where he worked for nearly half a century, knew him as a colleague, a mentor, and, above all, as a friend. ted kennedy was the baby of the family who became its patriarch, the restless dreamer who beca
an alternative energy project. the debate of sonia sotomayor will continue also, young america's foundation host its 31st annual student conference. congress does on healtbreak as healthcare heats up. in "the n.y. times close-" -- clinton secures two pardons from north korea -- that is in "the n.y. times." six months later it says here that obama returns with an approval rating of 56%. he is expected to tout his economic stimulus plan to kill us growth. he will announce manufacturing plants, but officials say there are successes to highlight locally, signaling that the times are getting better. it says that it is great that he can return to committees he cares so much about and see signs of success. i hope that he will go way encouraged, and he should. there are encouraging indicators that the economy is turning around, but the battle is far from over. long term there is reason to be optimistic, but still thousands of unemployed in this county begun until all are back to work, he does not think anyone can say it is all behind. on the phone now is a reporter for elkhart, indiana. what do you expe
that freedom and choice is what america has thrived on, and spread it around the world. going back to government control and everybody in taking all our money is not going to solve anything. host: caller, it is over to the sentiment by the cia director that it is time to move on to the business of protecting the country and not dwell on the past. caller: absolutely, absolutely. we are in a place where nobody has ever been before, and going back to the past is not going to help. host: thanks for calling. pablo on the line for democrats from brownsville, texas. caller: there are issues that have never even been discussed. host: like what? caller: there is a lot of secrecy and the cia and it goes back to a lot of people in my family who are now gone and not on this earth, but they worked for the defense department. there is something critical here. do we want the truth on everything? we want accountability. accountability to the people, our congress, and to our president. period. it is that simple. god bless you c-span for everything you do for public information and for freedom of sp
>>> good morning, america. breaking news, as former president bill clinton arrives in north korea. a high-stakes missionoe two, american journalists facing 12 years and hard labor. >>> running on empty. is this the last day to turn that clunker into cash? will the program stall out in the senate? >>> ten seconds of terror. passengers tell us about the moment their packed jetliner dropped like a stone. we answer your questions about turbulence. >>> as children head back to school, we have the swine flu survival kit. >>> and does air conditioning turn you into a popsicle? is this a female thing? we take a stand on our hot is this a female thing? we take a stand on our hot topics this morning. captions paifor by abc, inc. >>> and good morning, america. i'm diane sawyer, with chris cuomo. robin is on assignment, on this august 4th, 2009. and everyone has been thinking all along, who could sweep into north korea? who could gain the american journalists? >> the answer is presidentill clinton. he landed in the capital today. >> it's an extraordinary mission, as you say, because of the hi
at the belief in middle america that they are experiencing the blunt of this recession. the politicians had that huge stimulous pigout. that is one thing. secondly, healthcare, they believe this reform is going to take away benefits they have. i tell you, as exhilarated by these democrats, calling them un-american, harry reid calling them evil mongers, other people calling them mobs and thugs. the backlash against the democratic party here is astonishing. middle american by 2 to 1, they agree with the protesters and not with the democratic party. >> eleanor. >> first of all, cindy said to shout down over people views is un-american. they didn't call the shouters un-american. i think the president has lost momentum here. people who have insurance are worried that they are going to lose something in this very extensive package. and the president really doesn't have a single bill that he can point to. he doesn't have a clear message and all of the bills floating around on political provide lots of inviting targets for people who want to kill healthcare and want to kill the obama presidency a
of america and merrill lynch you. might recall ta both sides along with the sec i should say, the sides being bank of america and the sec providing submissions to judge overseeing this case yesterday. the judge overseeing this says that monday's submissions raised a few additional issues about the case. essentially the judge has a couple of questions specifically for bank of america and wants to know more specifics why the bank will spend $33 million to settle with the sec without admitting or denying wrongdoing if the proxy statement was not false or misleading, including whether it settled to curry favor with the sec. essentially when both sides, the sec and b of a submitted filings, they say that they relied on outside counsel to create the proxy statement. and rakeoff essentially says it is at war with common sense for a corporate officer who produced a proxy statement to say he relied on counsel and if the company does not waive privilege, meaning attorney/client, then the officer and council's culpability are beyond scrutiny. ray cough essentially ordering both the sec and bank of ameri
tonight to stand with you, to change america. >> he will be one of the greatest united states senators. there's no question about it. >> it is a mark of ted's greatness that he does not care who gets the credit as long as the job gets done. >> edward moore kennedy. >> ladies and gentlemen. >> he's been a democratic stalwart for morning four decades. champion of such social causes as civil rights, immigration reform and universal health care. in his personal life, senator edward kennedy has suffered great pain and been in the midst of great controversy, enduring what many called the curse of the kennedys. but tlhrough all of his politicl triumphs and personal tragedies, there has been one constant in the life of senator kennedy, a commitment to public service, a commitment first instilled by his parents, joseph and rose fitzgerald kennedy. childhood friends joseph patrick kennedy and rose fitzgerald marry on october 7, 1914. he is the son of a successful businessman, an irish-catholic community leader. she the daughter of john francis fitzgerald, the legendary honey fitz, a former congr
-- or nationalize health care in america. i don't intend to do anything to allow government bureaucrats to get between you and your doctor. >> senator, please forgive my teleprompter here. i've heard your recent rhetoric about how we want the same thing as obama and health care reform. i disagree on every level. there is nothing in that bill that i would agree to and we have to stop giving ground. >> government isn't the answer, it's a cancer. >> right now, as dan lothian reports, the white house is working hard to stay on message. >> you don't know. you don't know. >> 74 going to be written off because they have cancer. >> why don't they take the health care being forced down our throats. >> you don't trust me? >> there's a lot of debate about the health care debate. some are calling it a mismessage. >> there's a concern that if this misinformation machine continues and the record can't be corrected as the white house would like it to be that it could potentially make it more difficult to get health care reform? >> we'll get -- the debate is dominated by something that's not true, of course.
america and dana lohse, a radio show host and affiliate with the st. louis t.e.a. party coalition. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? has this thing devolved to the point where it's not only unproductive but could be potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it could be dangerous. congress is responsible for sitting tsit i setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for one of the important pieces of legislation of american history. people are reacting to that. they're tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. tired of going to a website and filling out a form e-mail. we're seeing at the town halls, people are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and want to express their concerns about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about this arguments, then? these people are not organized. it's a grassroots movement. these are americans who want to get involved in the process and deeply concerned about health care because it affects each and every one of us so much? >> it's fine to get involved and show up at a t
. huh. the new lightweight hp mini netbook with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. >>> welcome back to the most news in the morning. 26 minutes of a the hour. it's a long way from mexico but coastal maine, believe it or not, has become an emerging market for mexican drug cartels. >> the drug in demand, not marijuana, cocaine but heroin, a story you'll see only on american morning. >> reporter: when you think of the war on drugs you think inner cities, new york, chicago, l.a., d.c., but coastal maine? you may be surprised to hear heroin has become a huge problem too big to contain. lighthouse, lobsters. >> heroin, more heroin. >> and heroin? >> it's scary. >> thousands of miles from the drug cartels of mexico, this bucolic place in a mecca for heroin use. this detective has been working for decades. he says he's seen it all but never this. >> my case load for heroin has tripled over the last three years. >> that's incredible. >> yeah, i
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